Apple Time!

The pioneers who built their vacation cabins in this area were aware that fruit trees grew well. They planted numerous apple trees hereabouts. It looks like we’re in for another bumper crop of delicious fruit this year. 

This apple fell from my neighbor’s tree and I rescued it. By the time I had eaten most of it and thought to take a picture, it had turned a little brown, but it was delicious, just the same.

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Let there be light!

A few days ago the incandescent bulb in the standing lamp that gives light to my computer work area burned out. Okay, I thought, here we go again. 

It’s been increasingly more difficult than in days of yore to find bulbs for the lamp. It takes a three-way bulb, you know, three different levels of brightness. In truth, I only need the strongest setting, but I don’t dare insert a regular bulb for fear of a short or a fire. 

On my next trip to the store, I wandered the lighting aisle, seeking in vain the incandescent bulb I needed.

Over the last year, most of the hideous mercury-tainted bulbs in the section have been replaced with LED bulbs, more expensive individually, but much better for our health. A few incandescent specialty bulbs remain, such as the ones in ovens, refrigerators, and microwave ovens. But there were no three-ways available. 

Finally, I spotted a three-way bulb among the LED boxes. Instead of the common 50/100/150 watt using brightnesses, this one only uses 6/15/22 watts of electricity. I’m not used to rating my bulbs by the lumens, so I don’t know how this bulb compares to the incandescent ones, but it gives off 700/1600/2155 worth of brightness. Probably sufficient for my purposes.


I put it in my basket, cringing at the $18+ cost, but hope to get at least five years worth of light out of the bulb rated at ten years if I only use it for three hours a day. 

What writer only uses their work space for three hours? Not me. However, I now have light, albeit blue-tinged instead of yellow. I hope I get used to that!

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Busy Weekend

I’ve been tied up with choir practice for a special church event that takes place twice a year. This weekend, we finished practices and sang.

LDS congregations are geographically based. They are called “wards” or “branches,” depending on the number of members therein. I live within a branch. Several congregations are grouped into an entity called a “stake.” A stake is similar in concept to a Catholic diocese. My stake is the Payson Arizona Stake.

Twice a year, members forego holding the usual weekly worship services and instead, attend “stake conference,” where we have a Saturday evening and a Sunday morning meeting. We listen to talks from our local leaders as well as from visitors from the mission and temple that pertain to us. We are in the Scottsdale Arizona Mission, and the Mesa Arizona Temple district. From time to time, we have visiting authorities from church headquarters in Utah.

A temporary stake choir made up of volunteers sings at each of the general meetings. That’s what I participated in. Our director is an excellent musician, as is our accompanist. It was a real joy for me to sing with all those who joined the choir.

I traveled the 20 miles to Payson on both days. Then today I attended a luncheon in town to thank the volunteers who worked so hard to to bring off the Payson Book Festival. We had a great time.

Left to right: Connie Cockrell, Payson Book Festival Director, and Marie Fasano, Volunteer Coordinator.

Some of the Payson Book Festival volunteers.

More volunteers.

I don’t mind the travel time for such good causes.

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